Webinar abstract

Where do your corporate customers need to improve? Their Negotiation skills or their Cultural awareness? Are they accomplished technical negotiators who would benefit from increasing their intercultural awareness and sensitivity to the values of other people? Or are they multi-culturally competent executives wishing to brush up on negotiation skills?

In this short webinar, we will highlight the 7 most expensive mistakes that many companies are currently making and that are costing them millions.

We will cover:
1. The cost of cultural stereotypes - the false assumptions people make about their power and the power of the other party.
2. Risk - each culture experiences risk differently and behaves in a unique way which must be understood to achieve long-lasting and ethical outcomes.
3. Dirty tricks - either party makes the assumption that the other won't notice, mind or remember! Wrong Wrong Wrong!
4. Legitimacy and justification - few of us realise how culture impacts this critical area of negotiation.
5. Trading - we will look at haggling in the bazaar at one end of the scale and lawyers talking across a desk at the other.
6. Communication in negotiation - the intention to send a message is sadly undermined by the ability of the receiver to interpret the message as sent.
7. Trust and difference - various cultures have a different expectation of what constitutes trust.

Whether you are a coach, trainer, teacher or researcher helping executives and students to understand negotiation and culture, this high-energy broadcast will give you plenty to think about and a couple of invaluable tools to take away and use for the benefit of your organisation, yourself and the outcome of your next negotiation.

 

 

 

 MatthewHill

Matthew Hill
Matthew Hill is a senior facilitator, author and broadcaster working in the field of culture, negotiation, conflict and leadership.

He has published a 5 CD box set on Negotiation and has authored a book on Leadership. Matthew has been a president of SIETAR UK in the past.